Hunter O'Reilly's name changed January 2009.

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Interview with Hunter O'Reilly

Living Drawings

Art Gallery

In Wisconsin QuickTime Movie:
8 min. 35 sec. (9.1 Mb)
© 2004 Wisconsin Public Television

Viewing DNA Under the Moonlight
Drawings created with
living bioluminescent bacteria.

Anthrax Clock
Features Micrographs
of Anthrax

[Art Gallery] [Biography] [Contact] [Curriculum Vitae] [Genetics Research] [Media Coverage] [Media Room] [Radioactive Biohazard] [Seminars]

[Photos of Hunter O'Reilly]

In the Living Drawings Exhibition Hunter O’Reilly creates controlled line drawings using bioluminescent bacteria. The bacteria then grow in the host environment. Bacteria become collaborators in the art as it grows and dies.

Hunter O'Reilly created Radioactive Biohazard, an exhibit reinterpreting science as art looking at biotechnology from a positive perspective. In this exhibit O'Reilly confronts issues related to human cloning, stem cell research and the human genome project, among others.

Both an internationally shown artist and also experienced geneticist, O'Reilly reinterprets science as art through abstractions, digital art and installations. She holds a Ph.D. and Master's degree in Genetics from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and a Bachelor of Science from the University of California-Berkeley. She teaches biology and art at Loyola University Chicago. She created a course, Biology Through Art, where students have the opportunity to create innovative artworks in a biology laboratory.

With biotechnology becoming a greater part of our daily lives, there seems to be a movement in the art world to integrate art and science. O'Reilly discusses the unusual results of the integration of art and science in contemporary art in seminars she has given at the University of Michigan, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), the Milwaukee Institute of Art and Design (MIAD) and the University of Wisconsin-Parkside.

Contact information for Hunter O'Reilly.

Art Gallery
Observations in the laboratory and the world around her inspire the shapes in her abstract oil paintings. Hunter's abstract art hints at both organic matter at the highest level (human faces) and at the smallest level (single cells). This section includes many images of artwork.
Biography
Hunter O’Reilly obtained a Ph.D. in genetics from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and graduated cum laude from the University of California, Berkeley. Her abstractions have been shown internationally including galleries in New York, San Francisco, England, Italy, Japan, the Czech Republic, Indiana and Wisconsin.
Biology Through Art Course
O'Reilly teaches biology and art at Loyola University Chicago. She created a course, Biology Through Art, where students have the opportunity to create innovative artworks in a biology laboratory. Students view microorganisms, use DNA as an artistic medium, create music based on DNA sequence and see anatomy as art. The course culminates in students creating their own biological self-portrait.
Contact
Contact information for Hunter O'Reilly and Electric Eye Neon.
Curriculum Vitae
A resume of O'Reilly's education, artistic experience and research experience.
Genetics Research
Learn about proteins binding DNA and how that effects the regulation of gene expression. Read O'Reilly's original scientific abstracts.
Links
Links to websites about artists, art resources and genetics.
Media Coverage
Read newspaper, magazine and television interviews with O'Reilly about her art and genetics. See pictures of her journal covers.
Media Room
A selection of high resolution images for the media to download.
Radioactive Biohazard
O'Reilly reinterprets science as art in the Radioactive Biohazard project, using an actual laboratory bench artistically enhanced, actual lab cell images displayed and modified as art, and preserved genetic mutations from a genetics laboratory.
Renaissance 2001
Hunter O'Reilly is a proud member of this international group of artists.
Seminars
With biotechnology becoming a greater part of our daily lives, there seems to be a movement in the art world to integrate art and science. O'Reilly discusses the unusual results of the integration of art and science in contemporary art. She has given this seminar at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), the Milwaukee Institute of Art and Design (MIAD) and the University of Wisconsin-Parkside.


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